County Durham Accommodation:
Aldbrough St John
Barnard Castle
Beamish
Billingham
Bishop Auckland
Bowburn
Bowes
Brandon
Castleside
Chester Le Street
Consett
Cotherstone
Coxhoe
Croft On Tees
Crook
Darlington
Durham
Frosterley
Guisborough
Hartlepool
Haswell Plough
Houghton Le Spring
Ireshopeburn
Lanchester
Middleton In Teesdale
Newton Aycliffe
Ovington
Peterlee
Piercebridge
Portobello Birtley
Quebec
Romaldkirk
Rushyford
Seaham
Seaton Carew
Sedgefield
Shildon
Shotley Bridge
Spennymoor
St Johns Chapel
Stanhope
Stanley
Stockton On Tees
Thornley
Tow Law
Walworth
Weardale
Wearhead
West Auckland
Wolsingham

County Durham

BOOK COUNTY DURHAM HOTELS

Cauldron Snout Cauldron Snout

Information

County Town: Durham
Population: 875,600
Area: 1053 Sq miles 2726 Sq k
County Durham Jobs
County Durham Tips Page
County Reviews
Rather interesting County Durham facts
County Durham weather
Visitor reports
Your opinion of County Durham
Famous Dates
Famous People
Food Legends:Singin Hinnies
Folk Customs:
Durham Miners Gala
Greatham Sword Dance
Singing from Durham Cathedral Tower
Haunted Britain:
Cultural Britain:
Lore & legend:
Peg Powler
The Lambton Worm
Natural Britain:
Cauldron Snout
High Force Waterfall
North Pennines
River Wear
The Pennines
The River Derwent
The River Tees

Events

March
Sponsored Firewalk by Rainbow Trust

April
Annual Easter Chick Hunt
Brilliant Bonnets
Easter Activities
Easter Activities
Stockton Chic Vintique Fair
Treasure Trail
Wear Valley Food Festival

May
Friends of the Garden Plant Sale
May Day Madness
May Festivities
Northern Rocks Festival
The Crook Town Festival Of Music
World Heritage Site Weekend

June
Barnard Castle Chic Vintique Fair
Beamish Reliability Car Rally
Celebrate the Summer Solstice
Durham Raft Race: Wet & Wacky on the River Wear
Durham Regatta
Hartlepool Music & Arts Festival
Nissan Benfield’s Last Night of The Proms
Northern Rocks Festival
Raby Classic Car and Bike Show

July
Barnard Castle Chic Vintique Fair
Co Durham Game & Country Fair
Darlington by the Sea
Durham Miner's Gala
Festival of British Archaeology
Hartlepool Maritime Festival
MG Car Display
Stockton Chic Vintique Fair
Teesdale Food & Craft Festival

August
Ancient Egypt
Barnard Castle Chic Vintique Fair
Barney Big Bash Music Festival
Croft Chic Vintique Fair
Darlington 10km Road Run & 2km Fun Run
DLI Military Vehicle Rally
Falconry Displays
Hartlepool Horticultural Show
Islam
Japan
Local Legends
Midsummer Tales
Teddy Bear’s Picnic
Tomato & Chilli Mini-Fest

September
Bishop Auckland Summer Music Festival
Bowes Agricultural Show
Darlington Community Walk
Durham Military Tattoo
Durham Punk Festival
Eggleston Agricultural Show
Heritage Open Days
Heritage Open Days
Peterlee Show
Wolsingham and Wear Valley Agricultural Show

October
Half Term Family Activities
Halloween Crook Hall
Stockton Chic Vintique Fair
The Durham City Walk

November
Barnard Castle Chic Vintique Fair
Brancepeth Castle Christmas Craft Fair
Hartlepool Fireworks & Music Spectacular

December
A Traditional Victorian Christmas
Carols of Light
Christmas Market
Durham Traditional Christmas Festival
Greatham Sword Dance

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County Durham - 255 places to stay

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Principal Towns: Durham, Darlington, Hartlepool, Chester-le-Street, Barnard Castle, Bishops Auckland

Situated in the north-east of England, County Durham is an eclectic mix of the remote and sparsely populated dales and moors of the North Pennines in the west, the Great North Forest in the north, reclaimed Durham Heritage Coast in the east as well as highly urbanised areas. It’s one of the most attractive places to visit ‘up North’ for whatever reason and for however long as it manages to cater for most tastes whether modern or heritage based, as well as offer some great general tourist facilities and attractions, from museums and castles to great nature reserves, coastal spots and parks for outdoor activities.

The compact city of Durham itself is shaped by the River Wear which flows right through it, enclosing the centre on three sides to create Durham's "peninsula". It’s a hilly city claiming to be built upon the symbolic seven hills and, high above the Wear, in the most prominent position in the whole city, you won’t be able to miss Durham Cathedral which dominates the skyline. Durham Cathedral is one of the finest Norman buildings in Europe and contains the historic remains of St Cuthbert as well as The Venerable Bede. Together with Castle which stands opposite it, originally built by the Normans in 1071, it was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site and both are essential stops for any visitor to the city, even if not visiting as a tourist. There’s also a wide range of modern shops and restaurants in Durham which merrily co-exist with the Victorian Market area. As most of the shopping area is closed to traffic, there’s a nice relaxed feel to the centre and it is particularly enjoyable in the summer when there is some terrific street entertainment.

North Durham is a heady mix of wooded river ravines and valleys, dramatic moorland and rocky crags. Nature lovers will be particularly interested in its standing as one of the few remaining homes of the endangered red squirrel. The River Derwent is the focal point in the area and it feeds into the popular Derwent Reservoir, which is a magnet for sailing boats of all types and sizes so nautical enthusiasts should head here. Other points of interest include Causey Arch, the world’s oldest surviving railway bridge which is near the former mining town of Stanley. Whilst you are there you will also spot the world’s oldest existing railway upon which you can enjoy a three-mile steam journey on the Tanfield Railway and take in the impressive collection of vintage trains carriages housed in Britain’s oldest engine shed. North Durham happens to also be home to the Beamish Open Air Museum , one of the largest and finest museums of its type anywhere in the world and a brilliant day out for all the family.

You’ll find more reminders of the county’s railway heritage if you head to the South of the county. The town of Shildon was where George Stephenson ’s ‘Locomotion’ was first placed on the rails for the inaugural run of the Stockton and Darlington Railway. The town also boasts the National Railway Museum 's first ever 'outstation'. Thanks to National Lottery award, this branch of the Museum comprises a 6,000 square metre collections centre which is home to up to 60 vehicles from the national collection.

Moving eastwards you’ll come across the Durham coast with its sandy beaches and 11 mile Coastal Footpath. The success of area is testament to the incredible hard work and funding by various councils, government agencies, community groups and local individuals, which have brought about the dramatic transformation of beaches blackened with coal waste, the restoration and protection of grassland meadows, wooded valleys, streams and wildlife habitats along the coast. Since then there has been a whole raft of wildlife protection plans designed to safeguard important habitats along the coastline. Castle Eden Dene, Durham’s largest wooded coastal ravine, is already a National Nature Reserve, home to the rare Durham Argus butterfly and marine life such as dolphins, harbour porpoises, minke whales and basking sharks which pass regularly along the coast also figure highly in protection plans.

In the west of the County you will find some of the highest and wildest scenery in England. Part of the North Pennines, it is one of the country’s largest Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and meshes together rugged upland, majestic waterfalls, river valleys and green meadows with amazing panache making it an essential place for lovers of the great outdoors. It’s in the Durham Dales that you will find High Force, England’s largest waterfall, where the River Tees crashes 70 feet to rocks below. The Dales, particularly Teesdale, are recognized as one of the most precious wildlife areas in Britain and are especially recognized for the importance of their bird-life. They are home to one of Europe’s most important colonies of wading birds such as lapwings, golden plover and curlews. .

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Brit Quote:
It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change. - Charles Darwin
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On this day:
Battle of Lostwithiel - 1644, Battle of Dunkeld - 1689
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